Captain says ‘A’ will bring Malibu $1 mil

Malibu Lost Hills Sheriff’s Station Captain Tom Martin said if voters approve Measure A, the county proposal for a half-cent sales tax hike, it would bring more than $1 million to law enforcement services for the city of Malibu.

Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca first proposed the measure, although he failed to garner enough signatures to get it on the ballot. But the County Board of Supervisors approved it 4-1 during the summer, allowing for the placement. The measure, which requires approval by two-thirds of the voters for passage, would increase the county sales tax from 8.25 percent to 8.75 percent. The money generated from the sales tax increase would go toward all the law enforcement agencies in the county. It would also go to the District Attorney’s Office and to pay for more public defenders and probation officers.

Proponents say Measure A would address a crime epidemic in Los Angeles County and help with a county police shortage. Major proponents include Baca, Los Angeles Police Department Chief William Bratton and Leonard B. Jackson, president of the L.A. Council of Churches.

Opponents of the measure say the issues can be dealt with by utilizing unused county general fund money generated from a tobacco company settlement. Also, they say money can be freed up identifying and deporting illegal aliens from the county jails, and they say money designated for public safety purposes are often used for other governmental uses, which they said should stop. Major opponents include Los Angeles County Supervisor Michael D. Antonovich, retired Los Angeles County Sgt. Charles M. House and talk show host Mark Isler.

Another opponent is Malibu resident Doug O’Brien. He said, “Malibu residents are already paying the largest sales tax in California. If this passes, I’ll make it a point to go to Ventura County to shop.”

But Martin said Measure A is a good proposal because it brings much-needed money for law enforcement, and helps different cities for whatever their needs may be. He said the city of Malibu would be able to decide what to do with the extra money, which would become available in October 2005.

Advertisement

Up to 15 percent of the money could be spent on prevention efforts. This includes adult and juvenile crime prevention programs, such as STAR. The rest of the money would be spent on law enforcement, but it does not directly have to go toward hiring more deputies to patrol the city. It could go toward equipment or training.

Currently, Malibu has two patrol cars during the morning, four during the day, and two at night. Martin said the city could get up to eight new deputies on patrol, but he would recommend a different approach. He said he would like to see an impact team created that would target specific crime trends. For instance, if there were many car burglaries in one area, the team would be sent to investigate the issue through an undercover operation to capture the criminals. Martin said another good use for the money would be to hire a forensic specialist. Currently the Lost Hills Station must use the services of a forensic specialist who works in downtown Los Angeles.

Damien Weaver contributed to this story.

Previous article
Next article
13StarsManager
13StarsManagerhttps://malibutimes.com
The Malibu Times is the first newspaper in Malibu, serving the community since 1946.

Related Articles

Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement

Advertisement

Latest Articles

Advertisement

%d bloggers like this:
×